Mexican Engineer Builds “Plastic Houses” That Are Earthquake Resistant

-

Ramón Martín Espinosa Solís, a Mexican mechanical engineer, has come up with an innovative way to build earthquake-resistant homes.

How, we hear you ask!?

Well the intelligent graduate from the University of Guadalajara has developed a completely new type of material. Using his innovative technology, he was able to build these special eco-friendly houses from non-recyclable plastic that are resistant to earthquakes and seismic movements.

The material is simply made from used shampoo or milk bottles and broken up chairs. It is maintenance free, and he states that homes do not need air conditioning or heating due to the properties of the material.

It’s more resistant to seismic movements because the material is flexible.

Credit: Ecoplastico Ambiental

Solís explained:

“In this house there is no air conditioning, and the difference in temperature with the outside is around six degrees Celsius. This is due to the insulating materials that cause a slow heat transmission. In addition, the bioclimatic architectural design allows cross ventilation, so the heat that transmits the material from the outside to the inside is eradicated.”

A fully constructed 50-square-meter house will take around 4-5 weeks to build.

Far quicker than a conventional house made from the normal materials. Average house builds take around 4-5 months to complete according to the institution.

Credit: Ecoplastico Ambiental

What’s more, the plastic panels that make up the house are ultra-resistant to weathering and everyday wear and tear, not to mention using non-recyclable plastic that would otherwise find its way to landfill. The company estimates that their houses can last up to 100 years, increasing the normal lifespan of a home by 30-50 years. Conventional houses only last 50 to 70 years.

In addition, due to the fact that the material is made from castaway plastic, the cost is reduced up to 50%.

A single plastic panel measures 120cm wide by 240cm high with a thickness of 10 to 13 millimeters.

The majority of these panels come together in one shipment and makes construction of the house a lot quicker and more efficient.

Credit: Ecoplastico Ambiental

To manufacture the panels, they prepare the material by collecting plastic. It is then separated and ground up.

Once the plastic is ground, a water-less mixture is made and added to the mix. When it reaches the required stiffness, it is placed in a mold and into an oven at 220°C (428°F) to obtain the plates.

More information about the housing projects and other things such as tables and pallets made of reused plastic can be found on the Ecoplastico Ambiental website.

mm
Matt Orwell
Matt is a renowned journalist, activist, and life guru. A passionate writer and freethinker, Matt is awake to the reality that really molds us. By using his plethora of experience and knowledge, he is able to connect to the world, providing valuable insights and reporting in hope of creating a more informed, more sustainable, and more awake planet.

Most viral

“Extinct” Taiwanese Leopard Seen For The First Time Since Disappearing in 1983

In recent years, the Earth has experienced some really tumultuous times. Conservationists say that our planet is undergoing the sixth mass extinction in its...

Mexico’s First “Smart Forest City” Will Be 100% Food and Energy Self-Sufficient

Architecture firm 'Stefano Boeri Architetti' based in the Italian city of Milan has recently unveiled some mind-blowing designs for a nature-inspired "smart city" in...

Hemp Batteries Are Even More Powerful Than Lithium and Graphene, New Study Shows

Hemp is a wonder crop. It's an incredibly versatile plant that can be used for a huge range of purposes. Used in the sustainable manufacture of...

Latest Posts

Rare Kitten Born With ‘Two Faces’ Grows Up To Be The Most Beautiful Cat You’ve Ever Seen

It's fair to say that we generally stay well away from two-faced people, but I challenge you to find anything more adorable on the...

Scientists Discover a Giant Sunfish Larva For the First Time and It’s Completely Adorable

For the very first time, Australian and New Zealand scientists have successfully identified the tiny larva of the giant Bump-head Sunfish (Mola alexandrini). Dr. Marianne...